Arts

Arts give us a way to explore our lives and the lives of others, whether it's on canvas, on-stage or on a page.

Learn More / Page 3

Although many people think the magician's assistant is just there for her looks, she (it's usually a "she") is often the brains behind the illusion.

By Dave Roos

Today, when we think of a "pox," we think of smallpox. But in Shakespeare's time, the word referred to a dreaded sexually transmitted disease.

By Alia Hoyt

From its humble beginnings as an event for comic book nerds to its explosive impact on all forms of entertainment, some wonder if Comic-Con has gotten too big for its own good.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

Advertisement

HowStuffWorks talks to three modern-day "Megs" to find out how they were inspired by the character's bravery, ambition and intelligence to pursue real-life scientific success.

By Alia Hoyt

When people think of art, the first painting that pops in their mind is probably the Mona Lisa, but there are other important classical paintings. Take this quiz and find out how much you know about famous artists and their work!

By Alexis Robinson

Thanos, the purple bad guy hinted at since the very first 'Avengers' film, is finally going toe to toe with the heroes of the Marvel Universe. This can only end poorly.

By Bryan Young

With Greek and Roman gods so much more well-known, what made Stan Lee and Jack Kirby wade into Norse mythology when they created Thor?

By Bryan Young

Advertisement

It's not enough to feature death-defying acts in your show. Sometimes you need a 50-foot waterfall onstage, too.

By Robert Lamb

If hobbits were real, could they really maintain the energy needed to undertake the quests of 'The Hobbit' and 'Lord of the Rings'?

By Robert Lamb

Crayons are steeped in the artwork of our childhoods. So how did these incredibly popular little sticks of wax and color actually come about? And who decides the color names?

By Oisin Curran

Artist Paul Cummins' moving Poppies sculptures continue to tour the U.K. in honor of British soldiers killed during World War I.

By Sarah Gleim

Advertisement

'Domestic Medicine' was the most popular health guide for over 100 years. Which advice still holds up today and which is plain dangerous?

By Alia Hoyt

Before the days of Esquire and GQ, the famous poet wrote about men's health and grooming in newspaper columns. How does his advice stack up today?

By Dave Roos

It's been more than 200 years since her birth and we're still learning new things about this famous novelist.

By Kathryn Whitbourne

Pressures to seem macho can leave men off the dance floor — but it depends on the culture.

By Alia Hoyt

Advertisement

Although this writer and poet wrote seven volumes of autobiography, there are still some things you may be surprised to learn.

By Kathryn Whitbourne

When DC Comics rebooted "The Flintstones," few expected it to be a biting social commentary of the age, but guess what?

By Bryan Young

"One can consider how we might live a kintsugi life, or 'rebirth' finding value in the cracks ... bringing to light the scars that have come from life experiences."

By Alia Hoyt

From Margaret Wise Brown to Beatrix Potter, some children's authors have reputations for disliking kids. Are the rumors true?

By Kate Kershner

Advertisement

The superhero's creator imbued her with themes of truth-telling, a powerful matriarchy and even bondage, all pulled from his own unconventional life.

By Christian Sager

There's so much great fiction out there, but, as it turns out, many of these stories have something in common: their emotional arc.

By Kate Kershner

Chuck Wendig is the author of the Star Wars: Aftermath series. Learn more about Chuck Wendig and his tips on writing in this video from HowStuffWorks.

Comics can do things other mediums can't. Learn more about comics and what makes them unique in this video from HowStuffWorks.

Advertisement

He was the man behind those cheaply printed, widely disseminated fire-and-brimstone comics that were intended to scare the hell out of you. And he just passed away.

By Christian Sager

For 75 years, Wonder Woman has been a symbol for strength and empowerment for women. Now the United Nations has made it official.

By Bryan Young