Third Base

Third Base players have to be great fielders since most hits are directed toward this position. See which magic gloves graced the third base position in the Hall of Fame.


Jud Wilson was known as a fearsome hitter and fearless on the field. Known as one of the best pure hitter in history, he was probably better known for his on-field scuffles. The Special Committee on Negro Leagues selected him for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.

What can one say about Mike Schmidt except that he might be the greatest all-around third baseman ever to play the game? With a four-homer game and enough awards and statistics to make him a Hall of Famer in his first year of eligibility, he earns his title.

George Brett is often thought of as the greatest player to every play for the Kansas City Royals. Here you can learn about George Brett's Hall of Fame records for stolen bases and home runs.

Wade Boggs holds a career .328 batting average the highest of the last fifty years. A 7th round draft pick out of high school in 1976, he had to fight his way up the ladder and didn't break into the majors until 1982. Learn about Wade Boggs's career.

Hall of Famer George Kell revolutionized the role of third baseman in his career. In this section, you can check out the Hall of Fame stats for third baseman George Kell.

Eddie Mathews is best remembered as teaming with Hank Aaron to form the Atlanta Braves' one-two punch that dominated the National League in the 1950s and the early 1960s.

Brooks Robinson revolutionized the third base position. He was a soft-handed, accurate-armed man who did with reflexes and intelligence what can't be accomplished with just quickness and a strong arm. Learn about Brooks Robinson's accurate arm and see his statistics.

Ray Dandridge was a Golden Glove amateur boxer as a young man, then went on to be one of the greatest fielding third basemen in baseball history. He narrowly missed the batting title with a .362 average and was Rookie of the Year in 1949. Get more stats.

One of the hitting stars of the early 1900s was Frank "Home Run" Baker. He was known for his excellent play in the 1911 season when he led the AL in home runs. You can learn about the Hall of Fame career of Home Run Baker in this section.

The saying goes that first impressions are hard to erase. If so, then Fred Lindstrom’s arrival at Cooperstown was the culmination of an uphill journey. The Giants were on their way to winning their fourth consecutive NL pennant, and they needed Fred.

One of the best third basemen in Negro League history was Judy Johnson. He had some of the weakest batting stats out of the Negro League players inducted into the Hall of Fame but many people who saw or played with him agreed he was a great player.

Pie Traynor spent all of his 18 years in professional baseball with the Pittsburgh Pirates. While he may have been overrated with the glove, he was still an excellent third baseman. Find statistics for this Hall of Fame player.

Jimmy Collins was known as an innovator at hitting and third base. He also earned a reputation as a successful manager and was selected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1945. Here, you can learn about the career of Jimmy Collins.

The Hall of Fame in Cooperstown New York houses the shrines to some of the greatest third basemen that ever played the game of baseball. You can learn about the careers of Hall of Fame third basemen in this section.

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