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5 Worst Cases of the Yips in Baseball


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Steve Sax
Infielder Steve Sax of the Los Angeles Dodgers is ready to bat during spring training, 1984.
Infielder Steve Sax of the Los Angeles Dodgers is ready to bat during spring training, 1984.
Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

Steve Sax is another well-known baseball player who caught a bad case of the yips. Steve Sax Syndrome has been used to describe second basemen who can't throw the ball to first base [source: Star]. Unlike some other cases of the yips, the start of Sax's yips can be pinpointed.

In the 9th inning of the Los Angeles Dodger's home opener Sax threw the ball to home plate after Andrew Dawson, from the Montreal Expos, hit a triple. The only problem was that Dawson was standing at third when Sax threw the ball. The ball bounced and got away from the catcher and Dawson scored. Sax says it was an average error, but he did start to think about it and question his own timing and throwing after that [source: Demak].

Luckily for Sax, the yips didn't stick around. After accumulating 30 errors in the 1983 season, he went on to be one of the best second basemen in 1989, and played for 13 years [source: Star].