Photo courtesy DC Comics

The Beginnings

In 2005, Warner Brothers announced that Joss Whedon (Buffy, Angel) would write and direct a big-screen adaptation of the Wonder Woman story in 2006. That didn't happen, but for a while, Whedon was slated to write it with another writer -- William M. Marston. He created Wonder Woman back in 1941, but was also an attorney, a psychologist, an educational consultant and an inventor. Among other things, he can claim a leading role in the development of the polygraph lie detector and the systolic blood pressure test.

Marston's psychological specialty was gender theory, and he held some views which would be as radical today as they were in the 1940s. Depending on your perspective, you might consider him a crackpot or a proto-feminist.

The Wonder Woman Pages puts it this way:

"During his lifetime, Marston championed the causes of women of the day."

Another source puts it a bit differently:

"Among Marston's theories was that America would become a Matriarchy, and in many of his writings he espoused the view that women could and would use sexual enslavement to achieve dominance over men."