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Paintings by Paul Cezanne


Study: Landscape at Auvers by Paul Cezanne
Paul Cézanne's Study: Landscape at Auvers (oil on canvas, Philadelphia
Paul Cézanne's Study: Landscape at Auvers (oil on canvas, Philadelphia

Paul Cézanne's 1873 painting Study: Landscape at Auvers earned the warmest reception of the three works that represented Cézanne at the first Impressionist exhibition. The critic Jean Prouvaire questioned the Salon jury's rejection of Cézanne, and critic Émile Zola exalted Cézanne. Shedding the dark palette of his earlier works, Cézanne was beginning to be attentive to the structure, rather than the appearance, of his subjects; in Study: Landscape at Auvers Cézanne was starting to move away from the spontaneous imagery that critics linked with Impressionism.

For another example of Paul Cézanne's unique approach to his art, go to the next page.

For more on Impressionist paintings, artists, and art history, see:

For more on Impressionist paintings, artists, and art history, see: