Moving Poppy Sculpture Continues to Honor WWI Soldiers


A young girl reaches out at the "Weeping Window" installation that marks the centenary of World War I and was unveiled at the Senedd in Cardiff Bay on Aug. 7, 2017, in Cardiff, Wales. Matthew Horwood/Getty Images

The latest installation of the iconic sculptural exhibition, "Poppies: Weeping Window" opened Aug. 8, 2017, at the Senedd, the National Assembly for Wales in Cardiff. The cascading sculpture is made of thousands of handmade ceramic poppies that were key elements in the massive 2014 installation "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" at the Tower of London. That stunning display marked the centennial of World War I, which was the inspiration for artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper. Each handmade poppy was planted at the Tower of London by volunteers in memory of every British and Colonial soldier who died during the war — 888,246 total.

Both "Poppies: Weeping Window" and "Poppies: Wave" have been on tour since the ceramic flowers were removed from the Tower of London and have been installed in several different venues across the U.K. to promote discussion around the legacy of World War I. "Poppies: Weeping Window" will be on view at the National Assembly through Sept. 24 until it reopens again Oct. 14 at the Ulster Museum in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The next exhibition of "Poppies: Wave" opens Aug. 23 at Plymouth Naval Memorial in Plymouth, England. All of the exhibitions are free and run through 2018, when the poppy sculptures will be donated to the Imperial War Museums in England.

The latest "Weeping Window" installation was unveiled at the Senedd in Cardiff Bay on Aug. 7, 2017, in Cardiff, Wales. It's on display until Sept. 24 and then moves on to Ulster Museum in Belfast, Northern Ireland.
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Ceramic poppies fill the Tower of London moat in artist Paul Cummins' 2014 installation "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red."
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The traveling Poppies exhibits grew out of the massive "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" display at the Tower of London, where 888,246 ceramic poppies representing every British and Colonial soldier killed were planted.
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"Wave" was first installed at Yorkshire Sculpture Park in September 2015 in Wakefield, England.
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"Wave" was installed at Yorkshire Sculpture Park's Lower Lake alongside features such as the Bretton Estate's grand mansion house and the historic Cascade Bridge.
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The ceramic poppies were all handmade by artist Paul Cummins.
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An early evening view of the "Weeping Window" installation at St. Magnus Cathedral in April 2016 in Kirkwall, Scotland.
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"Weeping Window" was also on display at Caernarfon Castle as part of the U.K.-wide tour in October 2016 in Caernarfon, Wales.
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"Wave" was most recently on view at Barge Pier, Shoeburyness, Southend-on-Sea in April 2017 in Shoeburyness, England. You can catch it next starting Aug. 23, 2017, at Plymouth Naval Memorial in Plymouth, England.
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