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Top 10 Golf Swing Tips


9
Get a Grip: How to Hold a Golf Club, Part Two
Oops! Golfer Hunter Haas loses grip on his club at the New Zealand PGA Championship.
Oops! Golfer Hunter Haas loses grip on his club at the New Zealand PGA Championship.
Phil Walter/Getty Images

Now that you're holding your club with neutral hands, it's time to strengthen your grip by locking your hands together in one of three basic ways:

  • Vardon grip: Probably the most popular and common golf grip, the Vardon or "overlapping" grip is achieved by fitting the pinkie finger of the trailing hand between the index and middle finger of the lead hand.
  • Interlocking grip: The next most common grip works better for people with less powerful forearms, weak wrists or smaller hands. With this grip, the hands are literally locked together by curling the pinkie finger of the trailing hand around the index finger of the lead hand. The downside of this grip is that, with less finger pressure controlling the club, the handle can sometimes drift against the palms.
  • Ten finger (baseball) grip: Beginners, players with joint pain and those with small hands sometimes find the ten finger grip the most comfortable. To achieve it, simply lock the pinkie finger of the trailing hand close against the index finger of the lead hand.

[Source: Lamanna].

The perfect grip is key to improving your swing. A correct grip will help you impact the ball solidly on the club face. It will also give your wrists the proper hinge, which will improve your power [source: Lamanna]. All three grips have been used successfully by professional golfers. The grip that's right for you is usually the one you find most comfortable [source: Hughes].