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How Golf Simulators Work


Home Golf Simulator Requirements
The Golfers Indoor Paradise, the largest indoor golf facility in Germany, offers all year training with golf simulators, putting greens, bunkers and a driving range.
The Golfers Indoor Paradise, the largest indoor golf facility in Germany, offers all year training with golf simulators, putting greens, bunkers and a driving range.
AP Photo/Daniel Maurer

If you're a real golf fanatic, and you've got some extra cash, installing a golf simulator in your home could be a great way to improve your golfing prowess. Let's take a look at what's required to put one in your home.

Many of these simulators are relatively large, and they often require a full room -- or at least a big section of a room. Some simulators need as much as a 15-by-20-foot (4.6-by-6.1-meter) room for proper operation [source: Hit A Few Golf]. That may seem like a big sacrifice at first, but try to think of it as a kind of home theater.

The simulators usually consist of a large projection screen and a video projector that emits the image of the course and data from the computer. Simulators are also typically surrounded by an enclosure to keep the ball from flying across the room and to allow the golfer to block out everything around him or her.

The simulator itself is a computer system -- some use software that runs on an existing desktop or laptop computer, while others are stand-alone systems. You'll also need the tracking system, which connects to the computer in order to analyze your shot, and a hitting area (tee) to stand on. The tee area is generally made of a simulated grasslike material, and all of this equipment typically runs through a conventional 120-volt outlet [source: Sportnetting.com].

Meet these requirements and you'll never have to wait for the skies to clear up to play a few holes ever again -- you can even do so on your lunch break without ever leaving home.

Due to the fully outfitted, high-tech nature of these indoor golf simulators, some of them can cost more than a new car. But for the golf enthusiast who's serious about improving all aspects of his or her game, it's a small price to pay.

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