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5 Tips for Starting a Club Sports Team


2
Create a League of Your Own
As your organization grows, you'll find that having written guidelines in place will help to keep everyone on the same page.
As your organization grows, you'll find that having written guidelines in place will help to keep everyone on the same page.
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It might seem like overkill to draft a bunch of legalese if all you want to do is meet up with some friends for a game of Ultimate Frisbee on Sunday mornings. But as your organization grows, you'll find that having written guidelines in place will help to keep everyone on the same page.

It may be a given that you'll be the chairperson or commissioner of your new league. But if you'll be handling dues and registration fees, you'll also want to elect or designate a treasurer for your organization, and a secretary to keep track of discussions and meeting minutes. Expanding the board to five or 10 additional members can help to spread tasks such as fundraising, scheduling, marketing and recruitment so that one person (probably you!) isn't stuck doing all of the work.

While some community sports leagues go as far as to become incorporated as non-profit organizations, others prefer to operate less formally. Whichever route you choose, creating bylaws will help to define the structure of the league, giving players and board members a clear understanding of their roles within the club.

As any 8-year-old can probably tell you, playtime goes much more smoothly if everyone agrees to the same rules and regulations before the game begins. What are your league's rules regarding contact or physical roughness? How many players to a team? Co-ed or segregated by gender? What about cancellations, postponements and make up games? Work with your newly created board to get buy-in on the rules, and make sure each player signs off on a copy when they join the organization.