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How RoboRally Works


RoboRally Strategies and Editions

If you've played RoboRally by now, you know that trying to keep your robot alive and functioning can take all of your strategic muscle, without even attempting any flag-touching goal. In fact, that in itself may be a strategy: Just try to be the last bot standing.

When should you try that? It'll come in especially handy if you have some evil opponents who are more interested in picking off other bots than touching the flag. Avoiding the robots that are just trying to maim and kill is always best. (A good rule of thumb that also applies to humans).

If you're playing more of a game of strategy as opposed to all-out war, there's an advantage to being fast. Making sure you're actually planning the quickest way from point A to point B -- while being aware of what the robots around you are potentially up to -- is going to help you out. Remember that playing to touch flags and playing to stop the other robots at all costs are both fairly decent strategies; you might want to do an assessment of how the game is being played before you decide on either. You'll also need to decide if you want to capture Option tokens to get a boost, Power Down to mitigate Damage or get to a Repair Site to take away a Damage point instead of getting to the flag fastest.

If you're still jonesing for a more complicated game, expansions were released with the earlier versions of RoboRally. They include Armed and Dangerous, Crash and Burn, Grand Prix, King of the Hill and Radioactive. All are largely compatible with the new version and include items like new game boards, more Options or different obstacles.

And if you want even more practice, go online. Not only are there some pay-to-play options for multiplayer games, but there are also free versions to play against the computer. If you need more help, try out the fun -- and enormously helpful -- demo on the RoboRally official Web site. It'll give you or any rookies a good primer for how the game works, not to mention how the board is designed to "move."