Catchers

Catchers are often under-rated aspect of baseball teams. Learn who were some of the greatest Hall of Fame catchers in the history of the game.


Biz Mackey was a large, fun-loving catcher, but his personality was only part of his legend. Generally acknowledged as one of the top defensive players ever at his position, he was also a fine hitter. Learn more about this Hall of Famer.

Louis Santop is the first legendary batter quite a feat considering he played in the deadball era. He has been called the "black Babe Ruth" even though his career preceded the Bambino's. He entered the Hall in 2006.

Longevity and power -- not the most typical traits of a catcher -- were the attributes that set Carlton Fisk apart. He combined the two to lead all catchers in lifetime home runs (351) and games played (2,226).

"The Kid," they called him in New York, and Gary Carter was a perfect fit for the Big Apple. Already a seven-time All-Star when he arrived in 1985, Carter helped propel the Mets to a world championship.

For more than a decade, Johnny Bench was the best offensive and defensive catcher in the game of baseball. He led the NL in homers twice and RBIs three times. In his first year of eligibility, Bench was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Yogi Berra's good-natured charm concealed a deadly combination of power and accuracy in the batter's box. He won three Most Valuable Player Awards and he played in 14 World Series with the Yankees and Mets. Learn more about this great Hall of Fame hitter.

Roy Campanella was a success from the day he arrived in Brooklyn in mid-1948. The stocky catcher had a rocket for an arm, a powerful bat and guided a legendary pitching staff to five pennants in 10 years. Read about his stats and the tragic end to his career.

Ernie Lombardi retired with the 4th highest career batting average among players who appeared in over 1,000 games as a catcher and those who saw him play insist his .306 mark would have been much higher if he had quicker speed.

Bill Dickey caught every inning of every game during the Yankees eight World Series games. Dickey was not only known as the greatest Yankees catcher but as one of the greatest catchers of all time. Read about this Hall of Fame catcher.

Josh Gibson was an outstanding athlete who won medals as a swimmer before turning his full attention to baseball. He was known as one of the best hitters in the Negro League and achieved distances in major league parks that most white players of the era could only dream of.

Mickey Cochrane laid claim throughout his career to being the best-hitting catcher in baseball. His .320 batting average and .419 on-base percentage are both career records for a catcher, and his .478 slugging average is an AL record. Read more.

Rick Ferrell brought tremendous skill to the often-overlooked post of catcher. When Rick Ferrell retired, he had toiled behind the plate for more games than any previous American League catcher, and played over 18 seasons for three teams. Read his stats.

Roger Bresnahan was the first catcher to be enshrined in Cooperstown. He was a terrific baserunner and stole 212 bases in his career, an unheard-of number for catchers. Find out more about this baseball Hall of Famer and see his statistics.

Until Johnny Bench came along, Gabby Hartnett was the greatest catcher in the history of the National League. A prototypical catcher, he couldn’t run, would talk your ear off and lasted for years on a lot of bat and a lot more savvy.

Buck Ewing is quoted as having “supreme excellence in all departments -- batting, catching, fielding, baserunning, throwing, and baseball brains -- a player without a weakness of any kind, physical, mental, or temperamental.” Learn more about this multi-talented Hall of Famer.

Ray Schalk, a loyal White Sox catcher, holds the record for catching the most no-hitters. Get statistics on this Hall of Fame catcher.

Cooperstown New York is famous because it is the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame, which is a shrine to the game's greatest players. Here, you can learn about some of the catchers that can be found in the Hall of Fame.