Card Games

Card Games introduces you to the most popular styles of card games and how to win at each of them.


The mental math we do may be revealed in fleeting eye glances to the left and right.

You can if you play the new card game Contender. When else are you going to get the chance to tell the world about your very own nine-point plan?

The craps table is always a casino hot spot, but how can you be sure the game's legit? Learn just how casinos test dice and how avid players spot the cheats.

A card game that appears to have originated in Mexico, Con Quien comes from the Spanish "con quien?" (meaning "with whom?"). A two-player game, Con Quien emphasizes melds. Read this article to learn how to play Con Quien.

The game of poker is growing in popularity. However, along with the increased number of poker enthusiasts comes an influx of unusual terminology. Learn the poker terms and master the lingo that will help you feel like an insider.

There are countless varieties of poker games that you can play. Most of them are not available in casinos, which focus on a few well-known styles. Learn to play different varieties of draw poker which allows the player to trade in cards.

Whether you're playing at a casino or on the Internet it takes knowledge and inside information to be a winner. Learn the techniques for the numerous variations of poker -- we’ll teach you Texas Hold'em, Omaha 7-Card Stud and many more. Try your hand!

Whether you're playing traditional or online bingo, whether you believe in luck or "playing the odds," the rules and etiquette are largely the same. Get your basic bingo primer here.

Derived from the European games of chemin de fer and punto banco, baccarat is a game of mystery to the betting public even though it's a staple of American casinos. Learn how to play baccarat.

Keno's roots are in China and the game was brought to the United States by Chinese immigrants in the late 1800s. Now it can be found in most casinos. Ready to learn how to play?

Looking for an entertaining game to play when you don't have a foursome? Knaves is an easy trick-taking card game for three -- just remember to avoid the jacks! Learn how to play.

Leopard is an unusual and challenging two-player card game of changing spots. You'll have plenty of opportunities to befuddle your opponent in this advanced tic-tac-toe variation. Learn how to play.

The many names of this game -- Chicago, Saratoga, Newmarket, Stops, Boodle, and others -- show its far-reaching appeal. Though played with cards and chips, it doesn't involve betting. Learn how to play.

Molimba is a quick two-player card game that may feel at times like a tug-of-war. The goal is to end up with only two suits in your hand (called 'molimba'). Learn how to play.

Napoleon Bonaparte was neither the inventor nor the popularizer of this game, but his name is used for one of the bids. Two of his enemies, Wellington and Blucher, are also bids. Learn to play.

The card game Oh Hell! does have its momentary upsets, so if you need a name that's a bit more tame, just call it "Oh Well!" Learn the rules of play.

Many of us think Old Maid requires a special pack of cards, but actually its ancestral form some 150 years ago likely used a regular pack minus one card. Learn to play.

Spell it Kalooki, Kaloochi, Kalougi, Caloochi, or Kalogghi -- this double-deck Rummy card game has been a longtime club favorite in America and Great Britain. Learn about the rules of Kaluki.

Kings in the Corner is a card game that feels like everybody's playing a single solitaire. Of course only one person can win -- and more kings played mean more chances to win.

Try pronouncing this game "Klobber-yosh" -- or just call it Klob. Probably Hungarian in origin, this card game became a favorite for gamblers in the United States as a mano-a-mano contest. Learn the rules of Klaberjass.

Bezique, the forerunner of the card game Pinochle, was invented in the early 1800s. By the 1850s, it was a hit all across Europe and it soon arrived in America. Find out how to play.

Gleek used to be very popular in coffee houses -- about 375 years ago! Four players vie for the ruff and claim their gleeks and mournivals. Learn how to play Gleek.

Demon is a solitaire card game played by two to eight people, all at once, with everybody building on common piles. This game can get loud so you may need a whistle! Learn how to play the raucous game of Demon.

The popular Russian card game of Durok blends attack and defense, and uses trumps in an unusual way. The goal of the game is not to be Durok or "fool" the last player holding cards. Learn to play the card game Durok.

Over four decades ago, Robert Abbott developed this unusual card game. Other versions exist today, but this one, close to the original, is one of the most inviting. Learn how to play Eleusis.