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How a Baseball Scorecard Works


Baseball Scorecard Terms
On a baseball scorecard, the players' positions, types of errors, plays and outcomes are all represented by numbers and letters.
On a baseball scorecard, the players' positions, types of errors, plays and outcomes are all represented by numbers and letters.
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First, let's look at the terms involved when using a scorecard. Writing on a scorecard involves using a special type of shorthand. The players' positions, types of errors, plays and outcomes are all represented by numbers and letters. The numbers for the player positions on the field are as follows:

1 - Pitcher

2 - Catcher

3 - First Baseman

4 - Second Baseman

5 - Third Baseman

6 - Shortstop

7 - Left Fielder

8 - Center Fielder

9 - Right Fielder

These numbers indicate where the ball goes after it's hit. As for the plays, several letters and symbols are used. A single, double, or triple -- meaning a one-, two- or three-base hit -- is represented on a scorecard with an S, D or T. Some scorers also use one, two or three horizontal lines.

A homerun is written as HR, or four horizontal lines. The letter K stands for a strikeout, while F is a foul fly ball, BB is a walk, HP is for when the batter is hit by a pitch, SB is a stolen base, DP is a double play and E means an error [source: MLB.com].

Why are these numbers and symbols important? Because on your scorecard, you'll use them to represent how a play went. For example, if a player singled and then stole second base, your scorecard would indicate two horizontal lines and an SB for that batter.

Does it sound too complicated? Well, after plenty of practice, it really isn't difficult to memorize all of the symbols involved.

On the next page, we'll look at the scorecard itself and tell you exactly how to score the game on it.